First Subsea Crane for Lightweight Rope Handling
Advertise Here
Trending Topics:
Sunday, June 14, 2015

Ship Equipment
Ship Maintenance
Ship Systems
Worldwide Metric
Freeman Marine
Neptune Group

Home Page
About MarineTalk
Buyer's Guide
World InfoDesk
Discussion Forums
Advisory Board
Advertising Information
Submit Company Listing
Edit Company Listing
Site Map
MarineTalk Site Search:
Featured Companies

Royal Danish Naval Technical School
The school gives training and education in technical matters, primarily for technical personnel of the navy.Furthermore the school offers diving education,training in fire fighting, da- mage control,ship´s stability,NBCDprotection,fighting pollution

Marine Academy
Our marine academy provides extensive education and training in the area of navigation and radio communication.

Dutch shipyards have joined forces within the Netherlands' Shipbuilding Industry Association VNSI. This association of some 95 shipyards represents the interests of shipbuilders and ship repair yards.

The Missions to Seamen
The Flying Angel Club meets the needs of all seafarers and the general public by providing accommodation, transport foreign exchange, postage and telephone services.

First Subsea Crane for Lightweight Rope Handling


First Subsea Crane for Lightweight Rope Handling

Cargotec’s MacGREGOR has developed technology for handling lightweight fibre rope that offers several advantages compared with traditional steel wire rope, and is about to install the world’s first subsea crane to use fibre rope. The knuckle-jib crane equipped with a system for fibre rope handling will be installed on the subsea vessel Havila Phoenix. The 250-tonne Hydramarine active heave-compensated (AHC) offshore crane is designed with a 250-tonne/3,000m single-line winch and is prepared for a 250-tonne single-line fibre rope.

“MacGREGOR’s technology for handling lightweight fibre rope rather than traditional steel wire rope offers several advantages that will meet the ever-increasing demands of the offshore industry as operators move further into deeper and more remote territories,” says Řystein Bondevik, sales director in MacGREGOR’s Offshore division. “For example, due to the neutralisation of the weight of the fibre rope in the water, much heavier loads can be handled without strain to the crane at unlimited depths. Consequently, overall safety is improved due to the lighter equipment, which can still carry out heavy work operations.”

As world demand for energy increases while current oil resources of oil-producing countries are depleting, the offshore industry is forced to unlock access to the untapped sources of world oil supply. The renewed focus of the offshore industry on exploration and exploitation due to the decrease in current oil supply deposits has resulted in the rapid development of subsea technology for both oil and gas procurement.


About the Company

You may also like:
Trending Technology, World Shipping & Maritime News

Latest Marine News and Technology Articles | Maritime 2015 Buyer's Guide


E-mail:  Contact Us

Copyright © 1998 - 2015 MarineTalk
Division of Link Internet Business Solutions
All rights reserved.

The reproduction, retrieval, copying or transmission of this Web site content,
in whole or in part, is not permitted without the express permission of
MarineTalk .